Shell appoints Jessica Uhl as CFO Simon Henry’s successor

ROYAL DUTCH SHELL CFO Simon Henry is to step down after more than seven years steering the finances at one of the world’s largest oil and gas companies.

Henry (pictured) will remain as CFO until 9 March when he will sign off the 2016 annual report and hand over to his successor Jessica Uhl. Henry will stay with the oil and gas company until 30 June 2017 to help with the transition. He was a panellist at this year’s CFO Agenda.

Uhl, who will be a member of the executive committee and based in The Netherlands, joined Shell in 2004 and has held finance leadership roles in both Europe and the US. A US citizen, Uhl is currently executive vice president for finance for the integrated gas business.

Before working for Shell, Uhl worked for Enron, which ignominiously collapsed in 2001, in Houston and Panama from 1997 to 2003 and for Citibank in San Francisco during the 1990s.

Appointed as CFO in May 2009, Henry has worked at Shell for 34 years. He has held a variety of senior finance roles across the world, including CFO for exploration and production, head of group investor relation, finance manager of marketing in Egypt and FD for the Mekong Cluster.

Shell chairman Charles Holliday said Henry’s work on strengthening capital management and the balance sheet allowed the group to acquire rival BG.

Holliday said “His leadership in integrating the two companies and in re-orienting our strategy leaves us a financially stronger company. When he leaves our board, it will be with our very best wishes.”

Simon Henry said “Together we have made a difference in an industry that really matters to so many people around the world. I wish Jessica every success in the role, and am confident that she and Shell will deliver a world class investment, in the most responsible and sustainable way.”

CEO Ben van Beurden said: “Jessica combines an external perspective with broad Shell experience and is a highly regarded executive with a track record of delivering key business objectives from cost leadership in complex operations to M&A delivery”.

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